By Naturenomics Team
Wed, 06/22/2016 - 06:45
An international team of researchers analysed the five hectare fossil trackway site, known as Mleisa 1, in the United Arab Emirates. It features exceptionally long trackways of a single herd of at least 13 individuals, ancestors to modern-day elephants, probably Stegotetrabelodon syrticus, which had tusks in both its upper and lower jaws.
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By Naturenomics Team
Mon, 05/06/2019 - 13:59

BOTSWANA IS HOME to nearly half the continent’s remaining savanna elephants, most of them in the Okavango Delta. In a new 360-degree video, you can venture through this wilderness and get very up close and personal with its most iconic creatures. Sit at the feet of an elephant as it passes by. Watch as a group of adults and calves curiously look directly into your eyes and try to decide if you’re a threat. And watch the sun set over the grasslands as you sit beneath a 2,000-year-old baobab tree.

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By Naturenomics Team
Wed, 06/22/2016 - 07:00
An animal once believed to have disappeared from North America before humans ever arrived there might actually have roamed the continent longer than previously thought – and it was likely on the list of prey for some of continent's earliest humans, researchers from the University of Arizona and elsewhere have found.
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By Naturenomics Team
Wed, 05/08/2019 - 13:46

Illegally taking animals from the wild threatens many species with extinction.

WILD ANIMALS ARE being poached on a massive scale, with millions of individual animals of thousands of species worldwide killed or captured from their native habitats. Poaching poses a growing threat to elephants, rhinos, and other charismatic animals, as well as to smaller and more obscure creatures, like certain lizards and monkeys.

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By Naturenomics Team
Wed, 06/22/2016 - 10:01
Thanks to a hundred years of Hollywood movies, many people are convinced that mammoths, mastodons and other prehistoric elephants lived alongside dinosaurs. In fact, these huge, lumbering beasts evolved from the tiny,mouse-sized mammals that survived the K/T Extinction 65 million years ago, and the first mammal even remotely recognizable as a primitive elephant didn't appear until five million years after the dinosaurs went kaput.
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