By Naturenomics Team
Mon, 08/12/2019 - 14:29

It was the smell that put off the men and women charged with converting the subcutaneous fat from freshly slaughtered elephants into ruby red beads. It was noxious. Acrid. The fumes were stomach-churning as the workers in China spent hours curing then polishing translucent beads of fat that often didn’t retain their shape.

One trader told investigators with Elephant Family, a conservation watchdog based in London, England, that it took him an entire day to produce one bead.

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By Naturenomics Team
Wed, 08/07/2019 - 08:21

Elephants seem to have a capacity that no other animal is known to have. Using odour alone, they can tell whether buckets containing differing amounts of desirable foods contain more or less.

"Elephants are capable of doing something that a lot of other species are able to do using their eyes," Joshua Plotnik, the lead scientist on the project, told Quirks & Quarks host Bob McDonald. 

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By Naturenomics Team
Fri, 07/26/2019 - 14:36
Forest elephants engineer the ecosystem of the entire central African forest, and their catastrophic decline toward extinction has implications for carbon policy.
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By Naturenomics Team
Wed, 07/24/2019 - 11:23

These elephants remained solitary or associated in mixed-age and mixed-sex groups within the forested areas.

Environmental and anthropogenic factors have not just degraded elephant habitats and left them stressed, but also changed their social behaviour, notes a recent study conducted by the National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS), Bengaluru.

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By Naturenomics Team
Wed, 07/17/2019 - 13:15

Elephant extinction in the Congo basin could accelerate climate change by allowing 7% more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, according to a study published in Nature Geoscience.

This would mean an extra 3 billion tons of harmful carbon entering the atmosphere, lead researcher Fabio Berzaghi told The Independent.

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By Naturenomics Team
Mon, 07/08/2019 - 08:16

The discovery could have implications for trophy hunters, who target the biggest and oldest bulls.

Measuring 10 feet tall at the shoulder and weighing over 6 tons, Matt the African savanna elephant is one of the largest land animals on Earth. And though the pachyderm is as old as 52, he still puts an incredible amount of energy into mating.

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