By Naturenomics Team
Wed, 07/24/2019 - 11:23

These elephants remained solitary or associated in mixed-age and mixed-sex groups within the forested areas.

Environmental and anthropogenic factors have not just degraded elephant habitats and left them stressed, but also changed their social behaviour, notes a recent study conducted by the National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS), Bengaluru.

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By Naturenomics Team
Thu, 07/04/2019 - 09:12

An incredible tale of how an elephant was once kept in an Edinburgh house has emerged in city archives, reports Sandra Dick.

Rowdy behaviour has become a major bugbear for Edinburgh residents fed up with tourists taking up temporary residence in neighbouring flats.

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By Naturenomics Team
Tue, 06/25/2019 - 10:04

Researchers find that an elephant’s trunk forms a kind of joint to pick up small pieces of food, a technique they say could be used as inspiration for robotic arms.

A team of researchers led by Jianing Wu at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia, USA, videoed an African elephant (Loxodonta africana) eating small pieces of food and measured the force its trunk exerted throughout the exercise. They found that the animal swept the food into piles and then formed a joint to pick up as much as possible at once.

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By Naturenomics Team
Thu, 06/06/2019 - 14:30

Most of us can look at two meal plates and easily tell which one has more food on it. But if someone turns out the lights, we’re out of luck. Not so for Asian elephants. A new study reveals that the pachyderms can judge food quantity merely by using their sense of smell, the first time an animal has been shown to do this.

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By Naturenomics Team
Tue, 06/04/2019 - 14:10

Elephants worldwide are threatened by deforestation and poaching for ivory. Reliable monitoring of their populations is a key priority for conservation policy and action. A new study done in Northeast India has shown that taking a series of photographs of elephants may be a good technique for determining actual number of elephants in an area.

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By Naturenomics Team
Tue, 04/23/2019 - 08:06

Elephants can create waterholes and footpaths

As the largest land mammal, elephants put their extraordinary size and strength to good use, shaping the land around them to suit their needs—and other animals’ as well.

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