By Naturenomics Team
Wed, 08/07/2019 - 08:21

Elephants seem to have a capacity that no other animal is known to have. Using odour alone, they can tell whether buckets containing differing amounts of desirable foods contain more or less.

"Elephants are capable of doing something that a lot of other species are able to do using their eyes," Joshua Plotnik, the lead scientist on the project, told Quirks & Quarks host Bob McDonald. 

0
By Naturenomics Team
Fri, 07/26/2019 - 14:36
Forest elephants engineer the ecosystem of the entire central African forest, and their catastrophic decline toward extinction has implications for carbon policy.
0
By Naturenomics Team
Wed, 07/24/2019 - 11:23

These elephants remained solitary or associated in mixed-age and mixed-sex groups within the forested areas.

Environmental and anthropogenic factors have not just degraded elephant habitats and left them stressed, but also changed their social behaviour, notes a recent study conducted by the National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS), Bengaluru.

0
By Naturenomics Team
Mon, 07/08/2019 - 08:16

The discovery could have implications for trophy hunters, who target the biggest and oldest bulls.

Measuring 10 feet tall at the shoulder and weighing over 6 tons, Matt the African savanna elephant is one of the largest land animals on Earth. And though the pachyderm is as old as 52, he still puts an incredible amount of energy into mating.

0
By Naturenomics Team
Tue, 06/25/2019 - 10:04

Researchers find that an elephant’s trunk forms a kind of joint to pick up small pieces of food, a technique they say could be used as inspiration for robotic arms.

A team of researchers led by Jianing Wu at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia, USA, videoed an African elephant (Loxodonta africana) eating small pieces of food and measured the force its trunk exerted throughout the exercise. They found that the animal swept the food into piles and then formed a joint to pick up as much as possible at once.

0
By Naturenomics Team
Tue, 04/23/2019 - 08:31

Both elephants and yellow-bellied sea snakes have skin that can create a water sheath around the animal, research finds.

 

In addition, sea snake skin has evolved to permit the animal to thrive as the only pelagic species of venomous sea snake. (Pelagic refers to species residing in the open sea.)

0
Button sidebar