By Naturenomics Team
Fri, 07/12/2019 - 07:33

“I am happiest when I am near elephants. City life doesn’t make me happy. Even at this moment, if you tell me that an elephant is trapped or in need of help, I will pack my bags and drive to that location”, says the man who has survived 20 near-death attacks by rogue jumbos!

The memory of Lakshmi is clear as day for Kushal Konwar Sarma.

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By Naturenomics Team
Fri, 07/05/2019 - 09:53

Its been five years since an elephant, fondly known as Raju, was rescued after being held captive. Raju celebrated five years of his freedom with a special cake.

An elephant, fondly known as Raju, celebrated five years of his freedom in a ceremony that was organised for him. Raju was held captive before being rescued by an NGO as he spent the first five decades of his life seeking alms for his owner on the streets of Uttar Pradesh. He was kept in custody illegally until he was rescued by the NGO Wildlife SOS in 2014.

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By Naturenomics Team
Thu, 07/04/2019 - 09:12

An incredible tale of how an elephant was once kept in an Edinburgh house has emerged in city archives, reports Sandra Dick.

Rowdy behaviour has become a major bugbear for Edinburgh residents fed up with tourists taking up temporary residence in neighbouring flats.

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By Naturenomics Team
Fri, 06/21/2019 - 14:26

A herd of elephants grazes in the abundant grasslands of western Zimbabwe sometime in the early 1980s.

Almost silently, the massive animals pluck leaves and branches from trees, occasionally pausing near small ponds to drink and splash in the mud.

It takes no more than 20 seconds to slaughter them all.

The elephants have been targeted in a culling operation — scheduled killings overseen and funded by the Zimbabwean government.

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By Naturenomics Team
Fri, 06/07/2019 - 14:03

Kerala is finally coming to the rescue of its abused and tormented captive elephants.

The southern coastal state, home to around a fifth of these 2,454 domesticated pachyderms in India, will take their custody if they are tortured or tormented by owners and mahouts, the New Indian Express newspaper reported on June 11. Owners unable to look after their old elephants can also hand them over for a nominal fee, Kerala forests and wildlife minister, K Raju, told the state legislative assembly.

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By Naturenomics Team
Thu, 06/06/2019 - 14:30

Most of us can look at two meal plates and easily tell which one has more food on it. But if someone turns out the lights, we’re out of luck. Not so for Asian elephants. A new study reveals that the pachyderms can judge food quantity merely by using their sense of smell, the first time an animal has been shown to do this.

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