By Naturenomics Team
Sun, 09/11/2016 - 07:34

A four-ton elephant which travelled more than 600 miles after becoming separated from its herd by floods had to be rescued in Bangladesh yesterday after almost drowning in a pond.

Villagers fired a tranquiliser dart at it after it burst out of the jungle and ran amok but the exhausted and distressed female ended up charging into a pond.

Local vet Sayed Hossain said: 'Hundreds of villagers came to its rescue when they saw the elephant had lost consciousness.'

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By Naturenomics Team
Sat, 09/17/2016 - 04:23

The state government has been sitting on the proposal of implementing the development of elephant corridors for the last six years.

The wildlife wing of the forest department had identified a 420.8km corridor for the pachyderms in 2010 and sent it to the government for its approval.

Six years have passed since then. But the government is yet to send it to the ministry of environment, forest and climate change for their approval and notification.

 

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By Naturenomics Team
Sat, 09/17/2016 - 04:31

The Wayanad leg of a Central project to restore elephant corridors has remained a nonstarter owing to apathy of Revenue Department officials and lack of coordination between departments.

The project is aimed at mitigating human-wildlife conflict in Wayanad.

Studies by the Centre for Ecological Sciences, Bengaluru, Forest Research Institute, Peechi, and the French Institute, Puducherry, have recommended restoration of elephant corridors as a permanent solution to address the issue and maintain viability of elephant habitats.

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By Naturenomics Team
Sat, 09/17/2016 - 04:43

Being a farmer is hard work — but being a farmer in places like Kenya, Botswana, and Sri Lanka has a unique challenge that other areas of the world don’t: elephants!

Wild elephants, whose natural behavior is to roam, have been known to march right through fields, damaging and destroying crops. When the human farmers try to intervene, things can turn ugly, and both human and elephant injuries and even deaths can occur.

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By Naturenomics Team
Thu, 06/30/2016 - 08:52
With a view to reduce man-elephant conflict, Tripura government has decided to erect electrified barbed wire fencing that will prevent the animals from straying into human habitations. Atul Gupta, Chief Wild Life Warden of the state, said that the Centre had sanctioned Rs 24 lakh to put up the wire fencing so that the pachyderms were confined to their reserves.
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