Author:

J. B. A. OKELLO, G. WITTEMYER, H. B. RASMUSSEN, I. DOUGLAS-HAMILTON, S. NYAKAANA,

Abstract:

We obtained fresh dung samples from 202 (133 mother-offspring pairs) savannah elephants (Loxodonta africana) in Samburu,
Kenya, and genotyped them at 20 microsatellite loci to assess genotyping success and errors. A total of 98.6% consensus
genotypes was successfully obtained, with allelic dropout and false allele rates at 1.6% (n 5 46) and 0.9% (n 5 37) of heterozygous
and total consensus genotypes, respectively, and an overall genotyping error rate of 2.5% based on repeat typing.

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Author:

J . B. A. OKELLO,*† G. WITTEMYER,*‡§ H. B. RASMUSSEN,‡¶** P. ARCTANDER,** S. NYAKAANA,* I .

Abstract:

Two hundred years of elephant hunting for ivory, peaking in 1970–1980s, caused local
extirpations and massive population declines across Africa. The resulting genetic impacts
on surviving populations have not been studied, despite the importance of understanding
the evolutionary repercussions of such human-mediated events on this keystone species.
Using Bayesian coalescent-based genetic methods to evaluate time-specific changes in
effective population size, we analysed genetic variation in 20 highly polymorphic microsatellite

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Author:

JOHN B. A. OKELLO, CHARLES MASEMBE, HENRIK B. RASMUSSEN, GEORGE WITTEMYER, PATRICK OMONDI,

Abstract:

We investigated population genetic structure and regional differentiation among African savannah elephants in Kenya using
mitochondrial and microsatellite markers. We observed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) nucleotide diversity of 1.68% and
microsatellite variation in terms of average number of alleles, expected and observed heterozygosities in the total study
population of 10.20, 0.75, and 0.69, respectively. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance of mtDNA variation revealed

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Author:

OgolaO. Patrick

Abstract:

The Meru elephant population suffered unequivocally from poaching in the 1970s and 1980s and declined up to a tenth of its size in this period. Results from aerial surveys and an individual elephant identification study conducted between 1990 - 1999 showed that the Meru elephant population did not register a significant increase in population size during the 1990s. It was under the foregoing that the Kenya Wildlife Service embarked on a translocation programme aimed at restocking the park. The Kenya Wildlife Service was concerned at the apparent insignificant growth of the population.

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Author:

Nadeem Farah, Moazzam Amna, Yaqoob Naila and Rehman Ishtiaq

Abstract:

Paper is one of the most in demand commodities of the world. Excessive deforestation has led to scarcity of wood resources,
and it is needed to conserve them to protect the integrity of the ecosystem. The pulp and paper scientists are continuously
struggling for non-wood raw materials that can be pulped in to exotic papers of high value. In the present study, an attempt
was made to investigate the potential of elephant dung as a non-conventional raw material to make exotic paper. For this

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Author:
Abstract:
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