Author:

Schumacher, J., Heard, D.J., Caligiuri, R., Norton, T., Jacobson, E.R., 1995.

Abstract:

Fourteen African elephants (Loxodonta africana) were immobilized with either etorphine hydrochloride (3.2 ± 0.5 µg/kg i.m.) or carfentanil citrate (2.4 µg/kg i.m.).

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Author:

Dathe, H.H., Kuckelkorn, B., Minnemann, D., 1992

Abstract:

Effects of introducing an unfamiliar female into an Asian elephant herd at Tierpark Berlin were monitored by means of salivary cortisol assessment.  Saliva samples were obtained from a second female for comparative purposes.  The period of familiarization was characterized by an enhanced cortisol level in both animals, with a maximum on the second day after joining.  Cortisol returned to normal on the following day.

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Author:

Sreekumar, K.P., Nirmalan, G., 1990.

Abstract:

Twenty-four adult Indian elephants (Elephas maximus indicus) of both sexes and different ages and weights, belonging to the Temple Devaswoms, the Forest Department of the Government of Kerala and the Gemini Circus formed the experimental subjects from which formulae were derived to predict the total surface area from either body measurements or areas of individual regions. Several models, using the parameters studied either singly or in combination, were tried independently for males and females and also for adults irrespective of sex.

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Author:

Clark, H.W., Bailey, J.S., Brown, T.M., 1985

Abstract:

Without a cell wall, the morphology, growth rate, and composition of mycoplasmas are culture media-dependent with variable properties best described as environmentally related. The adaptation of mycoplasmas to either a tissue cell or cell-free culture media, with dependency upon specific animal or plant products for survival, has led to investigations of their human host-related properties. The influence of culture media on the antibiotic sensitivities of mycoplasmas was measured by use of three different broths in two different assay systems.

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Author:

Brown, T.M., Clark, H.W., Bailey, J.S., 1980.

Abstract:

Rheumatoid arthritis in a gorilla was first observed at the National Zoo in 1969.  As the result of our preliminary report, several other gorillas were recognized to have similar symptoms.  These true animal models have been observed for seven to nine years with highly successful therapeutic results based upon a pathogenetic concept developed over a 30-year period in a study of the disease in humans.  The seriousness of arthritis in the gorilla is reflected by the reports we have received in the past few years of a total of 26 additional captive gorillas…

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