By Archiver
Mon, 10/22/2018 - 16:26

The elephant moved out of Xishuangbanna Dai Autonomous Prefecture of Yunnan Province and went for a stroll in neighbouring Laos before returning home two hours later.

Surveillance cameras at the Chahe border crossing checkpoint captured the elephant's movements.

The footage shows the elephant initially puttering towards the exit of the border checkpoint.

Upon reaching the border railing, the animal slowed down a bit and comfortably crossed the "obstacle" to Laos.

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By Archiver
Mon, 10/22/2018 - 09:35

A report by a British-based conservation group says rising Chinese demand for products made from elephant skin is driving poaching and posing an even greater threat to Asia's wild herds than the ivory trade.

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By Archiver
Sun, 10/21/2018 - 18:00

Asian elephants in Burma are being poached at an alarming rate—all to meet soaringdemand for the animal’s skin in China, where it’s considered a potent traditional medicine.

“Elephant skins? Give me four hours, and I’ll get you anything from the hunters in the jungle,” a shopkeeper at a pharmacy in Kyaikto, a town in southeastern Burma (also known as Myanmar), according to a Sept. 11 article in the English-language newspaper The Myanmar Times.

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By Archiver
Sun, 10/21/2018 - 16:20

Poaching of endangered Asian elephants for their skin is soaring in Myanmar, driven by huge demand in China where it is being used for medicine and jewellery.

British wildlife conservation group Elephant Family warns that the trend poses “a new threat” to their survival as, unlike tusk poaching, not only males but also females and juveniles are being targeted.

“Elephant skins? Give me 4 hours, and I’ll get you anything from the hunters in the jungle,” said a shopkeeper at a pharmacy in Kyaikto township of Mon State, when asked about the availability of elephant skin.

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By Archiver
Sat, 10/20/2018 - 05:58

At the end of last year, China announced a complete ban on its ivory trade and processing activities by the end of 2017. The news, a late Christmas gift to many conservationists, was greeted as a “game changer” by groups including the World Wildlife Fund, which says around 20,000 African elephants are being killed every year for their ivory. As the world’s largest consumer of ivory products, Chinese demand has seen poaching increase and ivory prices rise. The country has had a seemingly insatiable appetite for so-called “white gold”.

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