By Naturenomics Team
Fri, 09/16/2016 - 09:26

A painful discussion took place on television recently about how elephants are abused in captivity in India. We saw close-ups of cruel owners burning the soles of elephants’ feet, beating them, tying them up in chains, and allowing their wounds to fester, or even worse, applying inadequate medication roughly to their injured eyes.

A few days ago, we witnessed a bizarre social media spectacle of two medical students in Chennai filming themselves throwing a small stray dog off the roof of a house. Miraculously, the dog survived, was rescued, and is now known as Bhadra

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By Archiver
Sat, 10/13/2018 - 08:43

Almost 90 elephant carcasses have been found during a survey in northern Botswana, revealing "unprecedented" levels of poaching in the country, the conservation group carrying out the study has said.

Just nine carcasses were discovered in total during the last audit of the region in 2014, and Elephants Without Borders is expecting this year's number to rise further because the organization is only halfway through the study, which began on July 5 and is largely funded by Botswana's Department of Wildlife and National Parks.

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By Naturenomics Team
Fri, 09/16/2016 - 09:36

Amateur videos showing elephants being abused by handlers during one of Sri Lanka’s biggest Buddhist festivals have recently emerged. This type of abuse is not new: our Observer, a veterinarian in Sri Lanka, says that elephant owners and authorities turn a blind eye to this type of behaviour for both financial and political reasons

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By Archiver
Sat, 10/13/2018 - 11:08

The war against wildlife crimes in Kenya is far from over, despite punitive laws in place.

The third series of court monitoring report is dubbed Eyes in the Courtroom.

It was carried out in 121 courts between January 1, 2016 and December 31, 2017 to examine how well the Wildlife Act is being enforced.

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By Naturenomics Team
Fri, 09/16/2016 - 09:48

Fearing prosecution under animal rights laws, forest officials in West Bengal are trying to train wild elephants to work for the Forest Department, so that trained elephants 'past retirement age' can be given some well-deserved rest.

"We are giving training to elephants aged less than 8 years. The process to catch wild elephant(s) will start soon. Generally in this regard, we use those elephants who have come out from their group," the Additional Chief Forester (Wild Animals) of West Bengal told Ei Samay

 

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