By Naturenomics Team
Thu, 06/30/2016 - 03:24
Food Items and Feeding Strategies They are both browsers (feeding on shrubs and trees) and grazers (feeding on grass) Can consume many species of plants, as well as twigs and bark but usually only a few plant taxa
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By Naturenomics Team
Sat, 08/27/2016 - 10:07

Picture the Asian elephant without its elegant tusks. Ecological scientists filming the pachyderms for months together at the Kaziranga National Park in the north-east Indian state of Assam say this picture might become a reality in a few thousand years from now. The reasons, they figure, are two-fold. One, tusks are merely ornamental, not of much use to the animal and thus dispensable. And two, poaching pressures are rendering more and more elephants toothless.

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By Naturenomics Team
Thu, 06/30/2016 - 03:30
Asian Elephant, The largest land mammal in Asia, this intelligent, highly social animal lives in small groups led by the dominant female, or 'matriarch’. The elephant play a crucial role in its forest ecosystem. Commonly referred to as a ‘keystone’ species, it helps to open up forest clearings and distributes the seeds of trees and shrubs. 
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By Naturenomics Team
Sun, 09/11/2016 - 09:56

Asian elephants are the largest mammals in Asia. Related females form herds around one matriarch and live in tropical and subtropical forests. Asian elephants need a lot of water—up to 225 liters per day—so the herds stick close to a fresh source. They can spend more than two thirds of each day feeding on grasses, but will also eat bark, roots, leaves and stems. Their proclivity for cultivated crops, like bananas, rice and sugarcane, can bring elephants into conflict with humans.

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By Naturenomics Team
Thu, 06/30/2016 - 09:01
 Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus), the wild giants people revere and forebode as well have long been misery for the farmers south of the country. Yet we do not know how many of them are there in the wild.
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